Endodontics, Periodontics

Orthodontics & Oral Surgery
15075 Los Gatos Blvd., Suite 120
Los Gatos, CA 95032
(408) 884-8155

 Fax: (408) 252-1904
[email protected]

Endodontics is a specialized form of dentistry that treats diseases or injuries that affect the root tip or nerve of the tooth and the structures called the pulp chamber, pulp, and root canal of the tooth. Root canal therapy is the most common endodontic procedure. Endodontics is one of the nine specialties recognized by the American Dental Association; it was recognized as a dental specialty in 1963.


WHO IS AN ENDODONTIST?

An endodontist is a specialized dentist with special training in diagnosing and treating problems associated with the inside of the tooth.

Endodontists complete four years of dental school and an additional two or more years of advanced training in endodontics. Endodontists are also licensed by the state in which they practice.

Endodontists primarily perform root canal therapies, including re-treatment of previous root canals that have not healed completely, but are also qualified in diagnosing and treating oral and facial pain, as well as treating dental emergencies, such as toothaches, oral trauma, and cracked or displaced teeth. Endodontists can also treat more complex conditions, such as extreme pain, medically compromised patients, and anatomic problems including tooth curvature and calcification. Endodontists also perform certain surgical procedures, most of which are required as an alternative to conventional root canal therapy.

Endodontists also routinely acquire continuing education to stay abreast of state-of-the-art research, clinical procedures, and technology, such as operating microscopes, ultrasonics and digital imaging.


WHAT IS ENDODONTIC TREATMENT?

Endodontic treatment, commonly called "root canal treatment", is a common dental procedure that removes damaged tissue from inside the root canals of a tooth, thereby significantly lengthening the life of the tooth. Endodontic treatment significantly restores once damaged teeth and is a recognized and superior alternative to tooth extraction as a means of treating damaged interior structures such as pulp.


WHEN TO SEE A PERIODONTIST?

Anytime is a good time to see our office for a proper evaluation.

Often, the only way to detect periodontal disease is through a periodontal evaluation. A periodontal evaluation may be especially important if:

  • You notice any symptoms of periodontal disease.
  • You are not satisfied with your current tooth replacement option, such as a bridge or dentures, and may be interested in dental implants.
  • You are thinking of becoming pregnant. Pregnant women who have periodontal disease may be seven times more likely to have a baby born too early and too small. In addition, about half of women experience "pregnancy gingivitis." However, women who have good oral hygiene and have no gingivitis before pregnancy are very unlikely to experience this condition.
  • You feel that your teeth are too short or that your smile is too "gummy." Or, if you are missing one or more of your teeth and are interested in a long-lasting replacement option.
  • You have a family member with periodontal disease. Research suggests that the bacteria that cause periodontal disease can pass through saliva. This means the common contact of saliva in families puts children and couples at risk for contracting the periodontal disease of another family member.
  • You have heart disease, diabetes, respiratory disease or osteoporosis. Ongoing research is showing that periodontal disease may be linked to these conditions. The bacteria associated with periodontal disease can travel into the blood stream and pose a threat to other parts of the body. Healthy gums may lead to a healthier body.